PULS | PHOENIX URBAN LIGHT STUDY

Utilizing a multitude of camera systems including a FLIR infrared, 3D video , DSLR, and lenticular images I have attempted an address of this paradox of Urban Heat Island. Creating shifting, user-activated photographs, infrared video tours of the city, and stop motion light studies, this work redefines the spaces of the downtown Phoenix Metro area through scientific tools used artistically. The FLIR depicts heat signatures in real time, while the stop motion animations contract one day of reflected urban light into seconds of rapid solar movement. Lenticular imaging is applied as a method to create a shifting picture of weather pattern change.

Artists Statement
If you look at a map of Phoenix, it resembles a torso of a human. The highways and streets could stand in for nerves and vessels. The 101 interstate creates the frame of the ribs, while highways 17 and 51 section off a left and right side of the body. In the belly of this beast is downtown Phoenix, and if you gut it and empty the contents you will find what we consume….the pedestrian and the natural environment. The effects of Urban Heat Island are magnified in this area due to urban planning decisions, politics, and a general disassociation with what the surrounding communities want for their city. As light reflects from the steel and mirrored glass all day it chases people through the streets and into the shadows obliterating the only source of shelter . The light turns to heat and starts the cycle of increasing the temperature of the environment and its urban elements of pavement, glass, steel, and concrete. The cycle does not contain a renewal process since the elements never fully reset to normal temperatures; they gradually escalate the temperature of each other. The roads guide people through this space and it frequently feels like a test of endurance to pass through these areas in the debt of summer. The pulse of the city is immeasurable as cultural shifts sways to politics, weather, and the disconnection of communities that are only intertwined through the streets. The network of roads, paths, streets, freeways, and interstates connect all the separate membranes of the valley into one environment with the most common factor being heat.

Support for PULS was provided by Arizona State University Global Institute of Sustainability SMART Lab, Phoenix Transect, FLIR Infrared Cameras and Phoenix Urban Research Lab.

 

 

Title: Cityscape Looking South
Description: Time lapse video 60 seconds
Date: 2/2012
Location: Phoenix

 

 

Title: Endurance Test | Eupnea
Description: Infrared video loop 60 seconds
Date: 4/2012
Location: Phoenix

 

 

Title: Endurance Test | Tachypnea
Description: Infrared video loop 60 seconds
Date: 3/2012
Location: Phoenix

 

 

Title: Street View #1
Description: digital display: 2 Channel video loop from infrared & daylight video 60 seconds print version: Lenticular print, 8 x 10 inches
Date: 4/2012
Location: Phoenix

 

 

Title: Street View #3
Description: digital display: 2 Channel video loop from infrared & daylight video 60 seconds print version: Lenticular print, 8 x 10 inches
Date: 4/2012
Location: Phoenix

Sean Deckert

About Sean Deckert

Sean Deckert was born in Culver City, California in 1984 and grew up in southern Illinois with his mother and sister. He left to attend Arizona State University for a Bachelors in Fine Arts, where he studied under Betsy Schneider and Mark Klett. His development of portraiture and landscape involves techniques that require multiple technology combinations, complex layering of information, and holographic aesthetics that usually employ conceptual installation methods for the final piece. His work has been exhibited extensively in Phoenix and Los Angeles with upcoming exhibitions booked in multiple international venues. His network of friends/collaborators ranges from scientists to local community organizers that advise and assist him during the development of his work. He has volunteered extensively in his local arts community, including his membership with the Eye Lounge Collective and Artlink. Although he is trained as a photographer his work often associates with architecture, sculpture and video. Locality and the interpersonal identity of people are the central themes throughout the variety of mediums his work employs. His most recent work could be classified as ecologically and socially investigative due to its concentration on the sociopolitical environmental issues of urban spaces such as Urban Heat Island. Sean Deckert photographs intersections of time and place beneath the patterns of climate. His focus on urban landscape and the human development that unfolds in these spaces bears witness to the ecological impact relevant within contemporary cultures. Time lapse and infrared imagery build upon the historical role of photography as a scientific tool while still elevating the visual aesthetic above the documentary nature of the medium. Structural urban places become reminiscent of organic human bodies. Previously invisible solar patterns and heat signatures transform into respiratory rates. The sky becomes a tangible object to understand as a force in flux with these spaces. Using the most extreme cities as the synecdoche for his socially concerned vision, he works primarily in Phoenix, Arizona and Beijing, China. His work is evidentiary in nature although the intrinsic quality lies in its conception as art for the future of understanding what these issues look and feel like to the average citizen.

Website: http://www.seandeckert.com/